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Computer Coding For Dayton Youth

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Inner city youth in Dayton, Ohio are not getting the education and skills training they need to lead them to gainful employment and a chance at a hopeful future.

Lindsey's Back to Basics Youth Education Center helps them learn self-sufficiency, teaching them organizational, motiv... Read More


Inner city youth in Dayton, Ohio are not getting the education and skills training they need to lead them to gainful employment and a chance at a hopeful future.

Lindsey's Back to Basics Youth Education Center helps them learn self-sufficiency, teaching them organizational, motivational, and team-building skills in the context of learning computer coding and other computer skills that will give them the skills they need to enter into the field of computer technology.    

Posted By Lawrence Lindsey

November 07, 2017

Dear Family and Friends,

This is the final week for my initial crowd funding crusade to support Back to Basics Youth Education Center. During this process, I have come to understand that I must not be afraid to talk about something I believe in, and I must be willing and excited to ask others who believe in the same thing to help!  It is important for me not to worry about what you might think of me for asking for help, because this is about helping our kids – the inner city kids in the Dayton Community.

As most of you know by now, I grew up in the city of Dayton, growing up during the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the assassinations of President John F. Kennedy, Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King Jr., and Senator Robert F. Kennedy.  I lived through the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War protests, and the race riots in Detroit, Washington, D.C. and Los Angeles. The good news back then was that factory jobs were plentiful for youth in the inner city. There was a factory on every block; everyone had work if they wanted it.  If you were a smart kid, you saved money to go to college or to get training in a vocational career. Or you joined the military as a way to get help paying for college – which is the path I chose. 

After retiring from my military career, I found a new career as a guidance counselor in the Fairfax Public School System (FCPS) in the state of Virginia. The schools there are different than the schools in Dayton, Ohio – some high schools had over 5,000 students. The medium family income in Fairfax County Virginia hovers around $100,000, and on any given day you could see BMW’s in the high school student parking lots. FCPS students had all the computer technology and educational resources you could imagine. Every student had access to his or her own computer, math, science computer technology labs, textbooks could be accessed on line, and there were STEM curriculum and computer science electives at every level.

In 2014, I returned to Dayton, determined to give back to my community, and especially to the students at my alma mater – Dunbar Early College High School. I started by volunteering two days a week, introducing students to computer science, with an emphasis on the value of learning computer coding as a tool to lead them to a more successful future. I quickly learned what a different world Dayton is compared to Fairfax. While Dunbar has good football and basketball programs (although no physical education curriculum for the rest of the students), our students do not have access to adequate computer resources.  There is only one computer lab with outdated computers and software, and there is no computer technician assigned to the school. For the most part, our students do not have access to computers in their homes. This realization led me to establish the Back to Basics Youth Education Center program, offering computer technology education in an afterschool setting.

I will continue to give my time and money to Dayton youth to learn computer sciences, but I can’t do it alone.  Back to Basics will depend on people in the community who, like me, want to give our kids a chance to learn the skills they need to compete in today’s job market.

Please go to www.Uhelp.com and donate to “Computer Coding for Dayton Youth.” You can also go to  www.lbtbyec.org to learn more about Back to Basics Youth Education Center.  Your kind donations are tax deductible, and will make a big difference for Dayton youth.  I want to thank each of you for your generous donations.

Sincerely,

Lawrence Lindsey, Director

Back to Basics Youth Education Center


Posted By Lawrence Lindsey

October 31, 2017

I Am A Big Fan Of President Barack Obama. His Idea Of Wanting Every Kid In America To Learn The Computer Sciences Is Amazing. His Attitude And Willingness To Help Those Less Fortunate Gave Me The Will To Use My Own Money To Help Kids In The Inner City Of Dayton Learn Computer Coding. We Still Need Your Donations, So We Continue To Ask That You Go To Www.Uhelp.com. Scroll To Project List, "Computer Coding For Dayton Youth. Follow The Instruction To Make Your Donations And They Will Very Appreciated. Thank You!


Posted By Lawrence Lindsey

October 31, 2017

Newspaper Article Week 5

 

            During the past thirty-plus days, I have been on a marketing crusade.  I talked to family and friends, wrote letters, press releases, held fundraisers, made presentations, made videos, sent letters, brochures and business cards to local businesses, emailed family and friends, and reached out to local non-profits on Facebook. This crusade is aimed at increasing awareness about “Back to Basics Youth Education Center,” the nonprofit organization I founded to address the “digital divide” that is a barrier for inner city youth in Dayton, Ohio. 

 

            In the next decade, over a half a million computer science jobs will need to be filled, and our students in the inner city of Dayton, Ohio are not being prepared to fill them. Overall, Black and Latino students lag far behind in AP (Advanced Prep) classes, and they are not well represented in computer science classes when they are offered.  Back to Basics Youth Education Center wants to change this.

 

            Since 2015, Back to Basics has been recruiting college students to teach after school computer coding classes to high school students in the Dayton Public School system.  Due to space and funding limitations, we have assisted only a dozen students, but we are planning to establish a dedicated computer learning center in March 2018. The center will be designed to introduce students to online computer coding and get them interested in Science, Technology, Math and Engineering, (STEM). 

 

            The marketing campaign is still in progress. Donations are highly appreciated. Please go to www.Uhelp.com, scroll to project list and go to “Computer Coding for Dayton Youth” and follow the instructions to donate. You can find our website at www.lbtbyec.org.

 

            In an effort to help inner city students where he grew up, Lawrence Lindsey, retired educator and military officer, began recruiting college students to teach after school computer coding classes to high school students in the Dayton Public School system, and plans to open a dedicated computer learning center for his afterschool program in March 2018. The center will be designed to introduce students to online computer coding and get them interested in Science, Technology, Math and Engineering, (STEM).  You can reach him at  lbtbyec@gmail.com.

 

                         


Posted By Lawrence Lindsey

October 26, 2017

Contact: Lawrence Lindsey                        P. O. Box 33                                             BACK TO BASICS YOUTH EDUCATION CENTER

lbtbyec@gmail.com                                  Englewood, OH 45322

Phone: (937) 248-5360                              www.lbtbyec.org

 

 

 

 

PRESS RELEASE

THE REALITY OF CODING CLASSES

 

DAYTON – October 23, 2017

 

            Microsoft President Brad Smith predicts half million new jobs over the next decade will be created and require computer science know how from agriculture to manufacturing to more traditional forms of information technology. He thinks the country has a problem because the skills gap is leading too many jobs unfilled. Several scholars in the US believe the education system could do more to educate students in computer sciences. There is also a diversity problem among AP computer science students. Test takers are overwhelmingly white males (78%) and just (13%) either black or Latino.

 

            President Barack Obama passed the, “Every Student Should Succeed Act”. He wants every child in the United States to learn computer science. He asked congress to fund $100 million dollars for all districts to train teachers and purchase tools so that elementary, middle and high school students can provide opportunities to learn computer science. This computer-science-for-all initiative was hopeful to get the ball rolling and expose the nations students to coding and other related skills.

 

            Lawrence Lindsey, retired educator and military officer, has a solution to help students learn coding in his hometown. He moved back to Dayton upon retirement and created a non-profit organization, Back to Basics Youth Education Center.  He recruited computer science students from local colleges and universities to volunteer after school to help inner city youth learn basic computer skills and be introduced to computer technology, including coding. Over the past year, he has helped almost a dozen students during afterschool classes held twice a week at Dunbar Early College High School.

 

            Back to Basics uses three online learning resources.  The first is Code.org’s coding games, exercise and other online tools that promote computer learning.  The second is CodeAcademy.com, which is a more challenging interactive platform that offers free coding learning games and modules. And the third is Code Now.org, that provides online learning modules designed for middle and high school students and teaches foundational skills in computer programming.  Back to Basics Youth Education Center is registered with President Obama’s “My Brother’s Keeper Initiative”. 

 

            Back to Basics Youth Education Center is asking your kind donations to our campaign to help inner city students of Dayton realize their potential and be all they can be.  Find out more at our website (www.lbtbyec.org), and donate at www.Uhelp.com (Computer Coding for Dayton Youth) or through the Combined Federal Campaign (www.opm.gov).

 

Lawrence Lindsey, Director

Back to Basics Youth Education Center

 

FOR RELEASE 9 A. M. EST OCTOBER 28, 2017


Posted By Lawrence Lindsey

October 26, 2017

Contact: Lawrence Lindsey                        P. O. Box 33                                             BACK TO BASICS YOUTH EDUCATION CENTER

lbtbyec@gmail.com                                  Englewood, OH 45322

Phone: (937) 248-5360                              www.lbtbyec.org

 

 

 

 

PRESS RELEASE

THE REALITY OF CODING CLASSES

 

DAYTON – October 23, 2017

 

            Microsoft President Brad Smith predicts half million new jobs over the next decade will be created and require computer science know how from agriculture to manufacturing to more traditional forms of information technology. He thinks the country has a problem because the skills gap is leading too many jobs unfilled. Several scholars in the US believe the education system could do more to educate students in computer sciences. There is also a diversity problem among AP computer science students. Test takers are overwhelmingly white males (78%) and just (13%) either black or Latino.

 

            President Barack Obama passed the, “Every Student Should Succeed Act”. He wants every child in the United States to learn computer science. He asked congress to fund $100 million dollars for all districts to train teachers and purchase tools so that elementary, middle and high school students can provide opportunities to learn computer science. This computer-science-for-all initiative was hopeful to get the ball rolling and expose the nations students to coding and other related skills.

 

            Lawrence Lindsey, retired educator and military officer, has a solution to help students learn coding in his hometown. He moved back to Dayton upon retirement and created a non-profit organization, Back to Basics Youth Education Center.  He recruited computer science students from local colleges and universities to volunteer after school to help inner city youth learn basic computer skills and be introduced to computer technology, including coding. Over the past year, he has helped almost a dozen students during afterschool classes held twice a week at Dunbar Early College High School.

 

            Back to Basics uses three online learning resources.  The first is Code.org’s coding games, exercise and other online tools that promote computer learning.  The second is CodeAcademy.com, which is a more challenging interactive platform that offers free coding learning games and modules. And the third is Code Now.org, that provides online learning modules designed for middle and high school students and teaches foundational skills in computer programming.  Back to Basics Youth Education Center is registered with President Obama’s “My Brother’s Keeper Initiative”. 

 

            Back to Basics Youth Education Center is asking your kind donations to our campaign to help inner city students of Dayton realize their potential and be all they can be.  Find out more at our website (www.lbtbyec.org), and donate at www.Uhelp.com (Computer Coding for Dayton Youth) or through the Combined Federal Campaign (www.opm.gov).

 

Lawrence Lindsey, Director

Back to Basics Youth Education Center

 

FOR RELEASE 9 A. M. EST OCTOBER 28, 2017


Posted By Lawrence Lindsey

October 22, 2017

As Many Of You Know, Our Inner City Kids Don't Have Access To Technological Resources. They Don't Have A Chance To Learn Computer Skills That Will Give Them The Tools To Be Successful In The Global Job Market. In An Effort To Bridge That Gap, Back To Basics Youth Education Center Is Working With Local Computer-Science Student Volunteers. Donations Are Needed Right Away. You Can Go To www.Uhelp.com, Scroll To Project List To Find "Computer Coding For Dayton Youth" And Help The Kids In Our Community Get Ahead. Thank You. Your Donation Will Be Greatly Appreciated. 


Posted By Lawrence Lindsey

October 20, 2017

Contact: Lawrence Lindsey                        P. O. Box 33                                             BACK TO BASICS YOUTH EDUCATION CENTER

lbtbyec@gmail.com                                  Englewood, OH 45322

Phone: (937) 248-5360                              www.lbtbyec.org

 

 

 

 

PRESS RELEASE

BREAKING THE DIGITAL DIVIDE IN THE INNER CITY

 

DAYTON – October 19, 2017

 

                Computers are a global phenomenon and learning to use them is essential for today’s students to be able to compete in the modern work place. Computer education, computer technology and computer related learning are not readily available to inner city youth. The euphemism used to talk about this gap in access to computer learning is “the digital divide.”  This divide seriously threatens the future success of inner city youth.  Education and computer learning are at the heart of the solution to this challenge.

 

             Lawrence Lindsey, retired educator and military officer, has a solution to help bridge this divide in his hometown. He moved back to Dayton upon retirement and created a non-profit organization, Back to Basics Youth Education Center.  He recruited computer science students from local colleges and universities to volunteer after school to help inner city youth learn basic computer skills and be introduced to computer technology, including coding. Over the past year, he has helped almost a dozen students during afterschool classes held twice a week at Dunbar Early College High School.

 

            Back to Basics uses three online learning resources.  The first is Code.org’s coding games, exercise and other online tools that promote computer learning.  The second is CodeAcademy.com, which is a more challenging interactive platform that offers free coding learning games and modules. And the third is Code Now.org, that provides online learning modules designed for middle and high school students and teaches foundational skills in computer programming.  Back to Basics Youth Education Center is registered with President Obama’s “My Brother’s Keeper Initiative”. 

 

            Back to Basics Youth Education Center is asking your kind donations to our campaign to help inner city students of Dayton realize their potential and be all they can be.  Find out more at our website (www.lbtbyec.org), and donate at www.Uhelp.com (Computer Coding for Dayton Youth) or through the Combined Federal Campaign (www.opm.gov).

 

Lawrence Lindsey, Director

Back to Basics Youth Education Center

 

 

FOR RELEASE 9 A. M. EST OCTOBER 23, 2017


Posted By Lawrence Lindsey

October 18, 2017

Please donate what you can to help inner city youth in Dayton, Ohio learn computer technology skills that will allow them to compete in this field. Back to Basics will teach these youth the skills and knowledge they need and work with them on life skills and planning for their future! https://www.uhelp.com/computer-coding... Inner city youth in Dayton, Ohio are not getting the education and skills training they need to lead them to gainful employment and a chance at a hopeful future. Lindsey's Back to Basics Youth Education Center helps them learn self-sufficiency, teaching them organizational, motivational, and team-building skills in the context of learning computer coding and other computer skills that will give them the skills they need to enter into the field of computer technology.

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Posted By Lawrence Lindsey

October 16, 2017

Please donate to my Crowd Funding Campaign. Go to UHelp.com, scroll to the project list and see Computer Coding for Dayton Youth. Thank you!


Posted By Lawrence Lindsey

October 12, 2017

Hi Family and Friends.

I am trying to open a center for for inner city students in Dayton Public Schools.

As you know the need is great here in Dayton.

A DPS grade report was released and students are failing across the board. We have to do something.

Would like to ask you to donate $5.00 - $10.00 to my crowdfunding campaign on Uhelp.com

Thank you Larry Lindsey Lindsey's Back to Basics Youth Education Center


Find The Campaign On

$146 of $10,000

raised in 61 days from 6 people

Computer Coding For Dayton Youth

Lawrence Lindsey, Director

on behalf of

Lindsey's Back to Basics Youth Education Center

Please donate what you can to help inner city youth in Dayton, Ohio learn computer technology skills that will allow them to compete in this field. Back to Basics will teach these youth the skills and knowledge they need and work with them on life skills and planning for their future!

Mr. Lindsey is a retired educator committed to helping the inner city youth of Dayton, Ohio prepare for adult life through life skills and computer education that will lead them to a promising future.

Lawrence Lindsey

USA: Ohio (Dayton).

$20.00

Charlotte Harris 2 months ago

So happy to support your project.

$20.00

Richard J Mondloch 2 months ago

All the best with this new project, Larry.

$1.00

Veronica Taggart 2 months ago

Let's get this going!